19 September 2014

A Bunch for the Weekend - # 22 - Pink and Yellow Dahlia




This week on 'A Bunch for the Weekend' - I'm featuring some stunning pink and yellow Dahlias. Here in the UK Dahlias are still going strong - so yet again some more of this extraordinary flower.  




You'll need:
- nine stems of Dahlia
- a vase or some kind or container that matches the colour of the Dahlias
- 10-12 strands of raffia to tie around the vase
- two decorative plates that matches or picks up the colour in the flowers and the vase. It's good if one is bigger than the other, so you can see the decoration on both plates

As always - condition the flowers by removing any leaves that would end up below the water line in the vase. In this case I removed all the leaves as I didn't want any green showing. Cut the stems at an angle - to increase water absorption. Put in a clean container with tepid water and leave in a cool place over night or at least a few hours before making the final arrangement.




Twist the lengths of raffia loosely and tie them around the top of the vase. In this case a vintage pink jug. I looped it through the handle and made two simple knots - leaving the ends quite long to casually trail down the sides and onto the plates and table. I just like the simple and casual look. 

Cut the stems long enough for the shortest to rest on the edge of the container - then cut the rest in the middle a bit longer to form a round dome-shaped arrangement. The flower heads should sit just next to each other - quite closely together - but you should be able to see each individual flower head.

Finally - put the vase on the two plates and you have a pretty and romantic arrangement - for your table. 



Just for fun I have thrown in some vintage wooden spools of cotton - I love the worn old labels and that some are empty and others still have some of the old cotton tread left on the spool. 




In the background I arranged some of my favourite wicker baskets - in three different sizes - adding to the romantic country look.





Have a Wonderful Floral Day!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid

[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]


17 September 2014

FLOWERS by ingrid and titti - Autumn Wreath





For this week on FLOWERS - Titti and I are doing Autumn Wreath.

Here in my part of the world - the Hydrangeas are still in full bloom and it's such a beautiful late summer early autumn flower to make wreaths and arrangements with. 


I found some hydrangea in a gorgeous deep pink colour - and some ornamental cabbage that had a centre with the same colour. 

In addition I got a few branches of snowberries with clusters of lovely big round white berries.


As always - I conditioned everything and left the flowers and branches to recover in containers with deep water outside my kitchen door.

I didn't want to use wire, moss or evergreen foliage as a base - but went instead for a ready-made grapevine wreaths for making my autumn wreath. 

I wanted to make a wreath just using hydrangea flowers - so I started by cutting the big flower heads into smaller sections. I then used thin florists spool or reel wire and wired each individual head by winding the wire around each little stem. I then pushed the wire through the grapevine wreath and secured it at the back.

It's a wreath where you can replace the flower heads or you can leave it to dry. Hydrangeas continue to look good and the fuller you make it the better it will look when dried.
  

Ornamental cabbages are great to use in flower arrangements at this time of year. I found some with very long stems which meant that I could use them in a tall terracotta container. I did cut one down and used just the pink centre in a little green cup. 


Ornamental cabbage has beautifully multi-coloured leaves - the end of the stalks and the veins are deep pink against a lovely green background.  


Snowberries or Symphoricarpos - as they are called in Latin - is a shrub in the honeysuckle family - and they keep their unusual white berries long after the leaves are gone. 

I used them in two ways - leaving the stems long in a tall container and cut down very short in an old jam jar. I then put the jar in the middle of another small wreath. Just showing another way to use a ready-made wreath.  


Titti over on HWIT BLOGG is also posting her Autumn Wreath post today - so please - go over and see her take on the theme. 
You can look at our previous FLOWERS posts here and you can also see them on Pinterest.


Have a Wonderful Floral Day!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid 

[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for FLOWERS by ingrid and titti and Of Spring and Summer.]


14 September 2014

Florets - Floral Quote - # 76 - by Ngoc Minh Ngo




"The most profound legacy that Constance Spry left on the art of floral design is her emphasis on understanding the nature of plants and flower. A keen gardener, she had a deep appreciation of the intrinsic beauty of plants and flowers, which she sought to emphasize in her arrangements. In one of her last lectures, given in Australia in 1959, she said, "Let the flowers remind you of how they looked when growing." This is sensible advice. To show flowers to their best advantage, it makes perfect sense to appreciate their natural attributes, like the scalloped edges of a geranium leaf or the wavy bend of a poppy stem."

~ Ngoc Minh Ngo ~

[Ngoc Minh Ngo: New York based photographer, landscape designer and author of Bringing Nature Home.]
[Quote from: Bringing Nature Home by Ngoc Minh Ngo.]
[Flowers: Seven stems of double white Tanacetum - feverfew.]
[Vase: Vintage milk bottle.]
[Other props: Four zinc saucers, three little round stones and ribbons from Jane Means' ribbon collection.
[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]


Have a Lovely Floral Sunday!

~ xoxo ~ 

Ingrid


12 September 2014

A Bunch for the Weekend - # 21 - Zinnia




This week on 'A Bunch for the Weekend' - I'm featuring Zinnias.

I'm in love with these Zinnias - they are just such a riot of colours and who can be in a bad mood with flowers like this around.

Zinnias are a native of Mexico and some other South American countries. They come in a wide range of colours, including white, yellow, orange, red, purple and lilac. They are loved by butterflies and hummingbirds. A lot of gardeners find them a bit tricky to grow due to a tendency to develop mould, they also hate having their roots disturbed and it's important not to sow too early - as they like it warm. 

You'll need :

- about 25 stems of Zinnias
- a medium sized container with a large opening - I have used an old vintage zinc milk pail




As always - condition the flowers by removing any leaves that would end up below the water line in the vase - cut the stems at an angle - to increase water absorption. Put in a clean container with tepid water and leave in a cool place over night or at least a few hours before making the final arrangement.

In the final arrangement cut the stems so that the outer flowers rest on the edge of the container - then cut the rest a bit longer to create a nice dome-shaped arrangement. I removed almost all of the leaves as I wanted just a mass of colour with no foliage showing.



I also chose a neutral container for a vase - in this case a vintage zinc milk pail from my grandmothers house in Sweden. 



There are a few different types of Zinnias - but this particular one has quilled or rolled petals and they reminded me a bit of paper flowers.  



So just for fun I added a few craft things - some colourful rolled up card, some pink tissue paper, a bead necklace, some greeting cards and a few ribbons. 

The ribbons are all from Jane Means' ribbon collection. I'm one of Jane Means Ribbon Bloggers - and we feature her ribbons in some of our blog posts.  



Have a Wonderful Floral Friday!

~ xoxo ~ 

Ingrid

[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]


10 September 2014

Floral Styling - A Simple Flower Arrangement - # 9 - Alstroemeria, Snapdragons and Scabiosa




Being able to find several flowers that has almost the same colour is sometimes not easy. I felt so lucky to find three different flowers of similar colour and loved being able to combine these dark pink flowers in an arrangement. 



You'll need:  

- 9 stems of Alstroemeria
- 12 stems of Scabiosa
- 3 stems of Antirrhinum also called Snapdragons
- light-coloured or neutral vase with a fairly wide opening
- dark-coloured plate or tray
- some black buttons and a black frame

As always - condition the flowers by removing any leaves that would end up below the water line in the vase - cut the stems at an angle - to increase water absorption. Put in a clean container with tepid water and leave in a cool place over night or at least a few hours before making the final arrangement.

Start by trimming the Alstroemeria so that the flowers sits about 5-6 cm above the rim of the vase. Do the same to the rest of the stems - some of the flowers will naturally hang over the edge of the vase. 

Trim the Scabiosa to similar length and dot the flowers in amongst the Alstroemeria. 

Trim the snapdragons so that they sit above the rest of the other flowers - to suggest some movement and textural interest. 



I then positioned the vase on a black metal plate - a bit off-centre and added some vintage black buttons next to the arrangement.
   


All the buttons are from my mother's and grandmother's "button collections" - I think it was a way of thinking. "Never throw away a button - they might come in useful." When sorting out my grandparents old house in Sweden - I found several cake tins full of buttons. I kept a small amount - I especially like this collection of large black buttons from the 1930's, 40's and 50's in wood and early plastic materials. 




The black empty frame in the background picks up the black theme and nicely 'frames' this dark and dramatic late summer arrangement.

The flowers are grown by Cel Robertson at Forever Green Flower Company and I bought them at my local farmers market where they have a stall every Saturday morning.




Have a Lovely and Creative Day with Flowers!

~ xoxo ~ 

Ingrid


[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.] 


7 September 2014

Florets - Floral Quote - # 75 - by Paula Pryke




" One of the reasons I adore autumn is it gives me an excuse to use more colour, and particularly to enjoy the more vibrant colours in the spectrum. The fading light levels make us naturally drawn to the warmer, richer colours of nature and as our mood turns to heavier choices for food, so does our taste for colour and heavier decorations. My work throughout the year is always inspired by texture, but never more so than in this season."

~ Paula Pryke ~

[Paula Pryke OBE: British, London based florist, founder of Paula Pryke Flower Shop and School; and author of fifteen books.]
[Quote from: Flowers Every Day by Paula Pryke.]
[Flowers: Callistephus from the Aster family.]
[Vases: New purple pot from Homebase and a dark blue 'Blå Eld' toothpick holder from the 1950s.] 
[Other props: Different coloured garden twine, Swedish rag rug, vintage cake tin, flower scissors and ethnic carved black wooden figures.]
[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]


Have a Wonderful Floral Sunday!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid


5 September 2014

A Bunch for the Weekend - # 20 - Gladiolus




This week on 'A Bunch for the Weekend' - I'm featuring some Gladiolus in an amazing light green colour. 

It's a flower that I will forever associate with the Australian comedian Berry Humphries and his alter ego Dame Edna Everage. The Gladiolus was the character Edna's favourite flower and she would bring out big bunches on stage and during the finale throw the flowers into the audience. 



Gladiolus was for many years not a flower that I would ever buy. I associated it too much with being old-fashioned and for a long time it was hard to find. I'm now glad to see that it has made a comeback. 

I found these lime green beauties at my local farmers market. I made two arrangements - one large in a vintage zinc container and a very small one in a little contemporary Danish vase.  



It's such a wonderful structural flower - tall and slender so perfect for an arrangement in a tall vase. But I also wanted to see how it would work cut down and used with a very short stem.

You'll need - for the large arrangement:
- 7 stems of Gladiolus
- a tall container with a not too wide opening

You'll need - for the small arrangement:
- 1 stem of Gladiolus - cut down so that only 3-4 flowers remain
- small vase with straight sides
- small pebbles

As always - condition the flowers by removing any unwanted leaves - cut the stems at an angle - to increase water absorption. Put in a clean container with tepid water and leave in a cool place over night or at least for a few hours before making the final arrangement.

In the large arrangement - cut the stems so that the flowers sit just a short distance above the edge of the vase - showing a little bit of stem. I then simply arranged all the stems to just lean to one side of the container. It makes it all look a little bit less formal.

For the small arrangement start by trimming the stem so you only have a few of the top flowers left on the stem. Cut it so that the bottom flower sits just above the edge of the vase. You might also need to put a few little pebbles in the bottom of the vase to support the flower stem to stand straight. 


The little black vase is Danish and is called Lyngby Vase by Hilfling Design.

Gladiolus are available to buy during the summer and autumn. To be sure the flowers are fresh the leaves should be crisp. You also sometimes are given the advise to remove the tips of the flowers to stimulate the buds further down the stem - because the top buds often never open. 



Have a Wonderful Floral Friday!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid


[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]